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Popular director blasted on social media for sexist theme song

T
op society and culture news for January 24, 2017. Part of the daily SupChina news roundup "Musicians are the first victims of China-South Korea tensions."
6 months ago
Jiayun Feng

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  • Theme song from new Han Han movie faces online backlash over sexist lyrics / Weibo (in Chinese)
    Celebrity blogger, race car driver, and director Han Han’s new film, Ride the Winds, Break the Waves (also known as Duckweed), is set for release on January 28, but it’s already under fire for its sexist theme song. Titled “A Manly Manifesto,” the song includes lyrics such as “To be my wife, you should wake up earlier than me and go to sleep later than me,” “I am not capable of doing housework, so it is your work,” and “I might not have a love affair, probably not.” After the song’s release, online commenters quickly diagnosed Han Han with “straight man cancer,” a term coined by Chinese internet users to describe male chauvinistic attitudes. Some of the most upvoted comments are “I feel bad for the girl who married the guy in this song” and “I hate this song, but it represents the voice from the vast majority of men in contemporary China.” You can listen to the whole song here (in Chinese).
  • Chinese are celebrating lunar new year by escaping / Bloomberg
    According to a survey conducted by Chinese online travel service Ctrip.com, Chinese travelers will visit 174 destinations outside mainland China for 9.2 days on average during the upcoming Chinese New Year. Bloomberg attributes the trend to Chinese consumers’ higher levels of disposable income, new flights added by airline companies, and easier visa processes for countries such as Japan and Australia.

By Jiayun Feng
Jiayun is a Chinese native and was born in Shanghai, where she spent her first 20 years and earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism at Fudan University. Interested in writing for a global audience, she attended the NYU Graduate School of Journalism for its Global & Joint Program Studies, which allows her to pursue a journalistic career along with her interest in international relations. She has previously interned for Sixth Tone and Shanghai Daily.
China in 2 minutes a day
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