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A future social credit system raises concerns over individual security and freedom

T
op business and technology news for January 25, 2017. Part of the daily SupChina news roundup "A boost for family doctors, and missiles speculation."
8 months ago
Jiayun Feng

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  • Cashless society, cached data: Security considerations for a Chinese social credit system / Citizen Lab
    The Chinese government is testing a national social credit system “that draws upon citizens’ personal data to assign unofficial credit scores.” It is partly based on data provided by private companies such as Sesame Credit, a company established by Alibaba affiliate Ant Financial, and government bureaus. Citizen Lab voices concerns that social credit and mobile finance access might be blocked to “penalize citizens for acts of protest.”
  • Why China keeps bailing out ailing heavy industries / SCMP
    As total debt owned by companies and households in China is estimated to amount to 250 percent of annual economic output, the country is torn between saving state-owned companies to ensure their dominance in the economy and letting free-market competition eliminate underperforming companies. China “has pledged to clear up debt and get banks to finance productive activity instead of subsidizing state companies,” but the government has ruled out allowing any state companies to go bankrupt.

By Jiayun Feng
Jiayun is a Chinese native and was born in Shanghai, where she spent her first 20 years and earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism at Fudan University. Interested in writing for a global audience, she attended the NYU Graduate School of Journalism for its Global & Joint Program Studies, which allows her to pursue a journalistic career along with her interest in international relations. She has previously interned for Sixth Tone and Shanghai Daily.
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