China in 2 minutes a day
Top news and analysis delivered to your inbox

A double Korean headache for China

T
op politics and current affairs news for March 3, 2017. Part of the daily SupChina news roundup “Clickbait about China’s ‘parliament of billionaires’
3 months ago
Jiayun Feng

  • China is trying to punish South Korea by keeping its tourists away / Quartz
    China is continuing its retaliation against Seoul’s decision to deploy the American THAAD missile defense system. After denying applications of Korean pop stars who want to perform in China, halting a theme park project in Shenyang by Korean conglomerate Lotto, and recently blocking access to South Korean music and dramas, Beijing has apparently banned Chinese tour groups from visiting South Korea. According to Korean state media Yonhap, “China’s National Tourism Administration (CNTA) has told travel agencies to stop selling group packages and offering free trips from Beijing to South Korea.” In addition to orders regarding tour groups organized by travel agencies, CNTA also released a statement (in Chinese), saying that “in regards to the increasing number of cases where Chinese tourists were denied access to Jeju island, Chinese tourists should be aware of risks of traveling abroad and make careful choices of destination.”
    China’s relations with North Korea have also been strained: North Korean missile tests and the assassination in Malaysia of Kim Jong-nam, the estranged half brother of the North Korean leader, Kim Jong-un, are giving Beijing what The New York Times calls a double headache (paywall). The Times quotes Cheng Xiaohe 成晓河, an associate professor of international relations at Renmin University in Beijing: “One thing after another is happening… Not good things — all bad things.”

By Jiayun Feng
Jiayun is a Chinese native and was born in Shanghai, where she spent her first 20 years and earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism at Fudan University. Interested in writing for a global audience, she attended the NYU Graduate School of Journalism for its Global & Joint Program Studies, which allows her to pursue a journalistic career along with her interest in international relations. She has previously interned for Sixth Tone and Shanghai Daily.
China in 2 minutes a day
Top news and analysis delivered to your inbox

More from SupChina