Russia joins China to oppose U.S. missile defense in South Korea - SupChina
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Russia joins China to oppose U.S. missile defense in South Korea


  • China, Russia agree on more ‘countermeasures’ against U.S. anti-missile system: Xinhua / Reuters
    For nearly a year now, the U.S. and China have been at odds over an American plan to install a Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) system in South Korea. Today, Russia formally announced that it is joining China in opposing the plan and implementing unspecified “countermeasures,” in a statement that characterized U.S. actions as aiming to contain China and Russia.
  • China fears sovereignty rows with neighbors may spark ‘patriotic’ protests at home / SCMP
    Since the Tiananmen demonstrations of 1989, China has strictly controlled mass protests in nearly all situations — though local protests are generally allowed, as long as they do not question the legitimacy of the Communist Party or “threaten social stability.” Now the authorities see a new reason for concern: rising nationalism. An official responsible for maintaining domestic stability, not usually the type to be quoted in state media, wrote in the Global Times to single out “sovereignty disputes” as a cause of mass protests to watch out for and nip in the bud. For more on China’s struggles to control burgeoning nationalism at home and online, see this Financial Times article (paywall) from Monday.


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Lucas Niewenhuis

Lucas Niewenhuis is an associate editor at SupChina who helps curate daily news and produce the company's newsletter, app, and website content. Previously, Lucas researched China-Africa relations at the Social Science Research Council and interned at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York. He has studied Chinese language and culture in Shanghai and Beijing, and is a graduate of the University of Michigan.