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Surrogate motherhood and its critics


  • The People’s Daily urges “non-commercial surrogate motherhood” / People’s Daily (in Chinese)
    On Friday, the People’s Daily published an article arguing for a relaxation of regulations on “non-commercial surrogate motherhood” because infertility is a common problem for many Chinese people, especially older couples who want to have a second child under the new birth policy. According to the article, of the roughly 90 million Chinese couples who are eligible to have a second child, 60 percent of wives are over 35 years old, and 50 percent are over 40. People’s Daily also launched a poll on the social media site Weibo to ask readers’ opinions, but the poll was removed after attracting large waves of online criticism. Comments included “The government has no sense of shame at all in encouraging families to have more babies” and “What does non-commercial surrogacy mean? Who is willing to do this if not for money?”
  • Rong Jian on thought and scholarship in China / The China Story
    Rong Jian 荣剑 was a Ph.D. candidate in Marxist philosophy at Renmin University in Beijing in 1989. His academic career was derailed by the tumult of that year, and he became a businessman. In 2010, he began publishing essays on society, philosophy, and the place of intellectuals in China. His latest essay is provocatively titled “A China Bereft of Thought.” The link above connects to an introduction and translation of the essay by the scholar Gloria Davies.

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Jiayun Feng

Jiayun was born in Shanghai, where she spent her first 20 years and earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism at Fudan University. Interested in writing for a global audience, she attended the NYU Graduate School of Journalism for its Global & Joint Program Studies, which allowed her to pursue a journalism career along with her interest in international relations. She has previously interned for Sixth Tone and Shanghai Daily.