Statistics can be a profitable industry until you get caught - China politics and current affairs news from May 11, 2017 - SupChina
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Statistics can be a profitable industry until you get caught – China politics and current affairs news from May 11, 2017


Authorities first started investigating Wang Baoan 王保安, former head of China’s National Statistics Bureau, in January 2016, and officially charged him with corruption in August. Reuters reports that on May 11, 2017, he pleaded guilty to accepting the equivalent of $22 million in bribes between 1994 and 2016. The article notes that “as well as accepting gifts, property and bribes, he frequently stayed at expensive hotels, engaged in ‘superstitious activities’ and ‘exchanged power for sex,’” according to the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection (CCDI), the country’s major anticorruption task force. In exchange for the bribes, Wang secured project approvals or job appointments.


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Jeremy Goldkorn

Jeremy Goldkorn worked in China for 20 years as an editor and entrepreneur. He is editor-in-chief of SupChina, and co-founder of the Sinica Podcast.