Mixed signals and long-term anxiety over China’s economy - SupChina
Free

We're a new type of news publication

China news you won't read elsewhere.

Weekly Newsletter

Get a roundup of the most important and interesting stories coming out of China.

Podcasts

Sinica, TechBuzz China, and our 6 other shows are the undisputed champs of China podcasts. Listen now.

Feature Articles

Interactive, web-based deep dives into the real China.

Premium

Join the thousands of executives, diplomats, and journalists that rely on SupChina for daily analysis of the full China story.

Daily Newsletter

All the news, every day. Premium analysis directly from our Editor-in-Chief Jeremy Goldkorn.

24/7 Slack Community

Have China-related questions and want answers? Our Slack community is a place to learn, network, and opine.

Free Live Events & More

Monthly live conference calls with leading experts, free entry to SupChina live events in cities around the world, and more.

"A jewel in the crown of China reporting. I go to it, look for it daily. Why? It adds so much insight into the real China. Essential news, culture, color. I find SupChina superior."
— Max Baucus, former U.S. Ambassador to China

Free

We're a new type of news publication

China news you won't read elsewhere.

Weekly Newsletter

Get a roundup of the most important and interesting stories coming out of China.

Podcasts

Sinica, TechBuzz China, and our 6 other shows are the undisputed champs of China podcasts. Listen now.

Feature Articles

Interactive, web-based deep dives into the real China.

OR… for more in-depth analysis and an online community of China-focused professionals:

Learn About Premium Access Now!
Learn More
Minimize
Learn More
Minimize

Mixed signals and long-term anxiety over China’s economy

Part of the daily SupChina newsletter. Subscribe for free


The New York Times reports (paywall), “In a survey released by Bank of America-Merrill Lynch, fund managers in May named China the biggest potential source for an unpleasant surprise for global markets for the first time since January 2016.” China’s rapidly rising debt load — 257 percent of GDP at the end of 2016, up from 152 percent in 2007, and far beyond the 184 percent average for emerging economies — is a central source of concern to investors, the Times notes. The high debt level in China’s economy was also precisely the reason that credit ratings agency Moody’s cited when it downgraded the country’s rating in May, for the first time since 1989.

Nevertheless, most of the mainstream investing world remains cautiously optimistic about China’s economy. The stock-index compiler MSCI is forecast to have a decent chance of adding a selection of China’s stocks into its key, influential benchmark this week, and in March, Goldman Sachs “recommended investors increase their holdings of Chinese stocks, citing improved economic growth, stable policies and other positives,” the Times said. One of those positives, for the time being anyway, is that policymakers are “likely to do whatever they can to prevent drastic shifts in asset values” ahead of the important Communist Party meetings to be held later this year.


Share
Lucas Niewenhuis

Lucas Niewenhuis is an associate editor at SupChina who helps curate daily news and produce the company's newsletter, app, and website content. Previously, Lucas researched China-Africa relations at the Social Science Research Council and interned at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York. He has studied Chinese language and culture in Shanghai and Beijing, and is a graduate of the University of Michigan.