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The government gives itself a report card for 2017 – China’s latest political and current affairs news


The State Council’s website published an infographic (in Chinese) with a title that can be translated as “This year’s government work report — these assigned tasks have ALREADY! BEEN! COMPLETED!” The infographic has been widely promoted in both state and commercial news media. Some of the achievements are difficult to check up on, but whether they are real or not, the list gives a good idea of one way the government sees its priorities. The completed tasks listed are:

  1. Reduced types of value-added tax rates from four to three
  2. Built demonstration bases to encourage people to start their own businesses and to innovate
  3. Constructed 11 high-level, high-standard free trade zones
  4. Increased financial subsidies for health insurance for both urban and rural residents
  5. Increased basic pensions for retirees
  6. Raised subsidy standards for state scholarships for master’s and Ph.D. students
  7. Increased annual taxable income limit for small and micro enterprises (SMEs)
  8. Revised the industry guidance catalogue for foreign investment
  9. Cleaned up and regulated government funds
  10. Stopped central government administrative fees for companies
  11. Reduced charges on internet service and international calls
  12. Cleaned up production and services licensing
  13. Increased the research and development expenditure of science and technology SMEs
  14. Granted disaster insurance to farmers
  15. Expanded pilot areas for planting more feed crops

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Jiayun Feng

Jiayun was born in Shanghai, where she spent her first 20 years and earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism at Fudan University. Interested in writing for a global audience, she attended the NYU Graduate School of Journalism for its Global & Joint Program Studies, which allowed her to pursue a journalism career along with her interest in international relations. She has previously interned for Sixth Tone and Shanghai Daily.