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British prime minister borrows Xi Jinping’s language – China’s latest top news


British prime minister borrows Xi Jinping’s language

On October 5, British Prime Minister Theresa May gave a speech at a conference of her Conservative Party. CNN called it a “nightmare.” May was interrupted by a prankster, she had long fits of coughing, and then the stage set behind her failed: Lettering glued onto the backdrop, which read “BUILDING A COUNTRY THAT WORKS FOR EVERYONE,” stopped working as the F fell from FOR.

Aside from the theatrics, there was another signal that the Guardian says observers in China picked up on: May’s use of the phrase “the British Dream.” “It might have left some British voters mystified,” the article says, adding that her words sounded “strangely familiar” in Xi Jinping’s China:

A lot changes in 100 years. In 1917, Britannia ruled the waves and the sun did not set on her empire, while China was reeling from the collapse of the Qing dynasty and lurching into a half century of war, famine, and chaos.

Now Britain is borrowing not only money but also ideas from China.

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Jeremy Goldkorn

Jeremy Goldkorn worked in China for 20 years as an editor and entrepreneur. He is editor-in-chief of SupChina, and co-founder of the Sinica Podcast.