‘I’m not feeling positive’: Hong Kongers march again to resist Beijing’s influence - SupChina
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‘I’m not feeling positive’: Hong Kongers march again to resist Beijing’s influence

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Thousands of protesters — 10,000 if you ask organizers, 6,200 if you ask police — took to the streets in Hong Kong in an annual New Year’s Day protest against Beijing’s increasingly visible hand in the city, the South China Morning Post reports. By both organizer and police estimates, this year’s protest turnout was several thousand more than the last two years.

  • A primary drive for these protests was the news last week that the National People’s Congress (NPC) voted to allow “Chinese immigration checks and the enforcement of mainland Chinese laws” within part of a high-speed railway being built in Hong Kong.
  • SCMP notes other reasons for the rally: “opposition to changes to the rule book for the city’s legislature, which protesters fear will enable the Hong Kong government to force through unpopular legislation, including a highly contentious national security law”; and
  • The “political persecution of [pro-democracy] leaders, social injustices, urban planning without consultation and the monopolies held by some big corporations.”
  • Hong Kong celebrity Andy Lau, attending the protest, told Reuters that “If we have the right to demonstrate then we should. But I’m not feeling positive. I think things will get worse.

More on the political situation in Hong Kong:


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Lucas Niewenhuis

Lucas Niewenhuis is an associate editor at SupChina who helps curate daily news and produce the company's newsletter, app, and website content. Previously, Lucas researched China-Africa relations at the Social Science Research Council and interned at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York. He has studied Chinese language and culture in Shanghai and Beijing, and is a graduate of the University of Michigan.