Digital country life, and a new nickname for the Dallas Mavericks

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Live-streaming country life is turning some Chinese farmers into celebrities. Offbeat content such as farmers doing their chores gets extra attention. “Each day, farmer Liu live-streams video of his life in rural Sichuan Province to nearly 200,000 subscribers, who pay him the equivalent of $1,500 a month in virtual gifts — far more than anyone in his village has ever made.”

“Each day, farmer Liu live-streams video of his life in rural Sichuan Province to nearly 200,000 subscribers, who pay him the equivalent of $1,500 a month in virtual gifts — far more than anyone in his village has ever made.” NPR says that “offbeat content such as farmers doing their chores gets extra attention” in China and cites SupChina’s Jeremy Goldkorn for the reason: “It’s very difficult to get entertaining entertainment in China…the movies that are shown in the theaters and the stuff that is permitted on the internet are all highly censored, and as a result, highly predictable.”