White-clad mob assaults protesters, bystanders in Yuen Long, Hong Kong - SupChina
Free

We're a new type of news publication

China news you won't read elsewhere.

Weekly Newsletter

Get a roundup of the most important and interesting stories coming out of China.

Podcasts

Sinica, TechBuzz China, and our 6 other shows are the undisputed champs of China podcasts. Listen now.

Feature Articles

Interactive, web-based deep dives into the real China.

Premium

Join the thousands of executives, diplomats, and journalists that rely on SupChina for daily analysis of the full China story.

Daily Newsletter

All the news, every day. Premium analysis directly from our Editor-in-Chief Jeremy Goldkorn.

24/7 Slack Community

Have China-related questions and want answers? Our Slack community is a place to learn, network, and opine.

Free Live Events & More

Monthly live conference calls with leading experts, free entry to SupChina live events in cities around the world, and more.

"A jewel in the crown of China reporting. I go to it, look for it daily. Why? It adds so much insight into the real China. Essential news, culture, color. I find SupChina superior."
— Max Baucus, former U.S. Ambassador to China

Free

We're a new type of news publication

China news you won't read elsewhere.

Weekly Newsletter

Get a roundup of the most important and interesting stories coming out of China.

Podcasts

Sinica, TechBuzz China, and our 6 other shows are the undisputed champs of China podcasts. Listen now.

Feature Articles

Interactive, web-based deep dives into the real China.

OR… for more in-depth analysis and an online community of China-focused professionals:

Learn About Premium Access Now!
Learn More
Minimize
Learn More
Minimize

White-clad mob assaults protesters, bystanders in Yuen Long, Hong Kong

Hours after the latest anti-extradition bill march ended on Sunday night in Hong Kong, a gang of men in white shirts, armed with canes, batons, and other makeshift weapons, descended upon Yuen Long subway station in the northwestern part of the city, where they indiscriminately attacked protesters and commuters, injuring at least 45, including journalists, women, and children.

Gwyneth Ho of Stand News took this video:

Other videos from inside the trains were equally harrowing:

Many are speculating that the assailants are connected to the Triad, and might have been hired to carry out these attacks. After a month and a half of protests, it’s telling that last night had the highest injury count, by far.

Where were the police? That’s what people are asking in the aftermath.

According to the Guardian:

When police arrived at the station after 11pm, the assailants had left and angry protesters demanded to know why they had taken so long to get there. Hong Kong’s Hospital Authority said 45 people between the ages of 18 and 64, were injured in the attack, including one man who was in critical condition. Four men and one woman were in a serious condition.

On Monday morning, activists roundly criticised the police. A lawmaker from the opposition Democracy party said his party was investigating the potential involvement of organised crime.

“Is Hong Kong now allowing triads to do what they want, beating up people on the street with weapons?” Democratic party lawmaker Lam Cheuk-ting, who was among the injured, asked reporters.

The Hong Kong government issued a statement at 12:35 am Monday:

Following the storming of the CPGLO building, some radical protesters initiated a series of violent acts in Sheung Wan area, despite repeated warnings by the Police. These outrageous, violent acts included hurling petrol bombs, setting fires and throwing bricks. Thoroughfares were also blocked.

Meanwhile in Yuen Long, some people congregated at the platforms of the MTR station and train compartments, attacking commuters. It led to confrontations and injuries.

This is absolutely unacceptable to Hong Kong as a society that observes the rule of law. The SAR Government strongly condemns any violence and will seriously take enforcement actions.

People are outraged. It’ll be interesting to see the turnout for the next protest; we wouldn’t be surprised if it was the biggest one yet.

Anthony Tao

Anthony is the managing editor of SupChina. Follow him @anthonytao

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.