Justin Bieber joins Weibo. Is his China ban lifted? - SupChina
Free

We're a new type of news publication

China news you won't read elsewhere.

Weekly Newsletter

Get a roundup of the most important and interesting stories coming out of China.

Podcasts

Sinica, TechBuzz China, and our 6 other shows are the undisputed champs of China podcasts. Listen now.

Feature Articles

Interactive, web-based deep dives into the real China.

Premium

Join the thousands of executives, diplomats, and journalists that rely on SupChina for daily analysis of the full China story.

Daily Newsletter

All the news, every day. Premium analysis directly from our Editor-in-Chief Jeremy Goldkorn.

24/7 Slack Community

Have China-related questions and want answers? Our Slack community is a place to learn, network, and opine.

Free Live Events & More

Monthly live conference calls with leading experts, free entry to SupChina live events in cities around the world, and more.

"A jewel in the crown of China reporting. I go to it, look for it daily. Why? It adds so much insight into the real China. Essential news, culture, color. I find SupChina superior."
— Max Baucus, former U.S. Ambassador to China

Free

We're a new type of news publication

China news you won't read elsewhere.

Weekly Newsletter

Get a roundup of the most important and interesting stories coming out of China.

Podcasts

Sinica, TechBuzz China, and our 6 other shows are the undisputed champs of China podcasts. Listen now.

Feature Articles

Interactive, web-based deep dives into the real China.

OR… for more in-depth analysis and an online community of China-focused professionals:

Learn About Premium Access Now!
Learn More
Minimize
Learn More
Minimize

Justin Bieber joins Weibo. Is his China ban lifted?

Bieber was forbidden from performing in China in 2017.

Hey, Justin Bieber is on Chinese social media!

The Canadian mega pop star was banned from performing in China in 2017 by the Beijing Municipal Bureau of Culture, which — in response to a disgruntled Chinese Belieber venting about the artist skipping China in his world tour — stated that the singer was not welcome anymore after engaging in “a series of bad behaviors both in his social life abroad and during a previous performance in China,” causing widespread “dissatisfaction among the public.”

Now that two years have passed, it appears that the ban might have been lifted, at least partially, as Bieber joined Sina Weibo last week (in Chinese) and has been pretty active on the microblogging platform since. However, there are no reports of an upcoming Bieber show in mainland China.

bieber weibo

Calling himself a “famous Canadian singer” in the bio, Bieber made his first Weibo post on July 17. “Hello to my fans! I am excited to share updates from my life with all of you on Weibo!” he wrote.

In the days that ensued, Bieber blessed his Chinese fans with good content, including a “happy weekend” greeting, a photo of himself to promote his new streetwear label Drew House, and a video of the remix version of Billie Eilish’s “Bad Guy,” a song that he is featured on.

In less than a week, Bieber has already racked up more than 1 million Weibo followers. Yesterday, he even made an announcement about his Weibo debut on Twitter, a social media platform that has been officially blocked in China since 2009.

The summer of 2017 was an extremely tough one for Bieber, even before the China ban: A fan pelted him with a water bottle during a concert in Stockholm, he hit a 57-year-old paparazzo with his car, and hackers released nude photos of him on the internet. These moments added up and led to an apology from Bieber, in which he said he would work hard to be “a man that learns from his past mistakes and grows from them.”

After that wild summer, the public has seen positive changes from the singer, who’s now in love and into spirituality. It’s likely that Chinese officials are aware of the transformation, too. With Bieber making his way back onto the Chinese internet, there’s reason to suspect that a Bieber concert in China might be on the horizon.

Jiayun Feng

Jiayun was born in Shanghai, where she spent her first 20 years and earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism at Fudan University. Interested in writing for a global audience, she attended the NYU Graduate School of Journalism for its Global & Joint Program Studies, which allowed her to pursue a journalism career along with her interest in international relations. She has previously interned for Sixth Tone and Shanghai Daily.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.