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Hong Kong Yuen Long protest is banned, but protesters still plan gathering

Organizers want to mourn passing of former premier Li Peng.

Whoever organized the triad gang attacks in Yuen Long in Hong Kong on Sunday is probably pleased with this effect of their intimidation:

  • “The heads of 11 universities in Hong Kong have urged their students to refrain from attending a rally in Yuen Long on Saturday citing concerns for their personal safety,” the Hong Kong Free Press reported.
  • Then, the protest was banned: “On Thursday, the police issued a letter prohibiting the protest, after considering public safety, public order, other people’s rights and freedom,” also per HKFP.
  • However, protesters have found a workaround: BBC correspondent Stephen McDonnel tweeted: “So this is a bit cheeky: Hong Kong protestors denied permission to march on Saturday to the site of last weekend’s triad gang attacks on pro-democracy activists are now saying that they want to gather to commemorate the death of former Premier Lǐ Péng 李鹏.” Hong Kong law does not allow the police to deny permission for religious gatherings, which include mourning ceremonies.

Other developments related to the volatile situation in Hong Kong:

The head of the Hong Kong stock exchange has cautioned against Chinese military intervention in Hong Kong, saying it is not up to the People’s Liberation Army to do the police’s job.

Addressing a group of business and professional executives on Thursday, HKEX chief executive Charles Li Xiaojia said the PLA was “supposed to be here to…point [at] outside enemies. It’s not supposed to help Hong Kong to deal with our own problems.”

  • Should Beijing intervene forcefully in Hong Kong? / Hu Xijin in Global Times
    The editor of the nationalistic tabloid writes, “Would you like Beijing to be forceful, such as ordering the Hong Kong Garrison of the Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA) to take to the streets to maintain order? Personally, I am against this idea.” But he goes on to list three scenarios where he could find “a need” for strong intervention.
  • 社评:香港出了一批有迷惑性的现代汉奸 / Global Times
    The Global Times separately says that protestors in Hong Kong are “confused traitors.”

Links to understand Hong Kong and what is happening now

Hong Kong-related protest in Australia

Lucas Niewenhuis

Lucas Niewenhuis is an associate editor at SupChina who helps curate daily news and produce the company's newsletter, app, and website content. Previously, Lucas researched China-Africa relations at the Social Science Research Council and interned at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York. He has studied Chinese language and culture in Shanghai and Beijing, and is a graduate of the University of Michigan.

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