Beijing denies it has plans to replace Carrie Lam - SupChina
Free

We're a new type of news publication

China news you won't read elsewhere.

Weekly Newsletter

Get a roundup of the most important and interesting stories coming out of China.

Podcasts

Sinica, TechBuzz China, and our 6 other shows are the undisputed champs of China podcasts. Listen now.

Feature Articles

Interactive, web-based deep dives into the real China.

Premium

Join the thousands of executives, diplomats, and journalists that rely on SupChina for daily analysis of the full China story.

Daily Newsletter

All the news, every day. Premium analysis directly from our Editor-in-Chief Jeremy Goldkorn.

24/7 Slack Community

Have China-related questions and want answers? Our Slack community is a place to learn, network, and opine.

Free Live Events & More

Monthly live conference calls with leading experts, free entry to SupChina live events in cities around the world, and more.

"A jewel in the crown of China reporting. I go to it, look for it daily. Why? It adds so much insight into the real China. Essential news, culture, color. I find SupChina superior."
— Max Baucus, former U.S. Ambassador to China

Free

We're a new type of news publication

China news you won't read elsewhere.

Weekly Newsletter

Get a roundup of the most important and interesting stories coming out of China.

Podcasts

Sinica, TechBuzz China, and our 6 other shows are the undisputed champs of China podcasts. Listen now.

Feature Articles

Interactive, web-based deep dives into the real China.

OR… for more in-depth analysis and an online community of China-focused professionals:

Learn About Premium Access Now!
Learn More
Minimize
Learn More
Minimize

Beijing denies it has plans to replace Carrie Lam

Part of the SupChina Weekly Briefing newsletter. Subscribe for free

Photo credit: SupChina illustration

Beijing had a little Lam…

Mass protests in Hong Kong began nearly five months ago, sparked by the decision of Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam (林鄭月娥 Lín Zhèng Yuè’é) to introduce an extradition law amendment bill that would have undermined the city’s legal autonomy from mainland China.

At times in the protests, especially in their beginnings in June, Hongkongers have demanded that Carrie Lam step down, but this did not become part of the now widely accepted and reproduced “five demands” of the protesters.

Nevertheless, few in Hong Kong would complain if Carrie Lam were replaced — and Lam herself has been caught on tape saying, “If I have a choice, the first thing is to quit” — though the protesters’ fifth demand is for a more structural change: free and universal elections for chief executive.

…and everywhere that Beijing went…

Last week, the Financial Times reported that Carrie Lam is on her way out, with Beijing seeking to replace her by March next year with a candidate who doesn’t have any connections with the extradition law mess.

The Chinese foreign ministry dismissed this reporting as “political rumors with ulterior motives.”

…Lam was sure to go

Tellingly, the denial of the report from the Chinese foreign ministry has been scrubbed from the official transcript of the press briefing from last Wednesday (EnglishChinese).

CNN has also confirmed that discussions of Lam’s successor have taken place, although “a final decision has yet to be made by Xi.”

According to the Financial Times, “Leading candidates to succeed Ms Lam include Norman Chan [陳德霖 Chén Délín], former head of the Hong Kong Monetary Authority, and Henry Tang [唐英年 Táng Yīngnián], son of a textile magnate who has also served as the territory’s financial secretary and chief secretary for administration.”

Share

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.