Mood music, but still no U.S.-China trade deal - SupChina
Free

We're a new type of news publication

China news you won't read elsewhere.

Weekly Newsletter

Get a roundup of the most important and interesting stories coming out of China.

Podcasts

Sinica, TechBuzz China, and our 6 other shows are the undisputed champs of China podcasts. Listen now.

Feature Articles

Interactive, web-based deep dives into the real China.

Premium

Join the thousands of executives, diplomats, and journalists that rely on SupChina for daily analysis of the full China story.

Daily Newsletter

All the news, every day. Premium analysis directly from our Editor-in-Chief Jeremy Goldkorn.

24/7 Slack Community

Have China-related questions and want answers? Our Slack community is a place to learn, network, and opine.

Free Live Events & More

Monthly live conference calls with leading experts, free entry to SupChina live events in cities around the world, and more.

"A jewel in the crown of China reporting. I go to it, look for it daily. Why? It adds so much insight into the real China. Essential news, culture, color. I find SupChina superior."
— Max Baucus, former U.S. Ambassador to China

Free

We're a new type of news publication

China news you won't read elsewhere.

Weekly Newsletter

Get a roundup of the most important and interesting stories coming out of China.

Podcasts

Sinica, TechBuzz China, and our 6 other shows are the undisputed champs of China podcasts. Listen now.

Feature Articles

Interactive, web-based deep dives into the real China.

OR… for more in-depth analysis and an online community of China-focused professionals:

Learn About Premium Access Now!
Learn More
Minimize
Learn More
Minimize

Mood music, but still no U.S.-China trade deal

Part of the SupChina Weekly Briefing newsletter. Subscribe for free

trade dealcolor

Photo credit: SupChina illustration by Derek Zheng

A few quick updates on the latest spins around the Trade War News Cycle:

  • “The mood music is pretty good,” White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow said last Thursday, but President Trump “hasn’t signed off on a commitment for phase one.”
  • A ban on U.S. poultry imports was lifted last week, four years after it was put in place due to an outbreak of bird flu. Several cargoes of American soybeans were also purchased. But these purchases seem tied to commodity shortages in China, rather than to any concession in trade talks.
  • However, “tariffs are emerging as the main stumbling block” in negotiations, according to the Wall Street Journal, which would seem to be a problem when Tariff Man Trump is the one who has to sign the deal.
  • The ultimate amount of agricultural purchases are also still undetermined, according to Bloomberg, despite Trump’s claim on October 11 that he had secured purchases of “40 to 50 billion dollars’ worth of agricultural products.”

Meanwhile, two reports came out last week with dramatically different takes on U.S.-China relations:

  • Economic data does not show China “stealing jobs” at the expense of the U.S., and intellectual property protections have improved over time, John L. Graham and Benjamin Leffel wrote for the Harvard Business Review.
  • But getting tough on China is all the rage in Washington, judging by a nearly 600-page report from the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission that raised alarm about a multitude of aspects of the U.S. relationship with China.

For a more balanced take on the status of U.S.-China relations and where to go next, see this article in Bloomberg by Jude Blanchette and Scott Kennedy: U.S., China should seek managed interdependence.

Share

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.