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A defected Chinese spy’s sketchy story

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aussie defected chinese spy maybe

Photo credit: 60 Minutes Australia

Last Friday, Australian media outlet The Age published an explosive report about a man named “William” Wáng Lìqiáng 王立强, who apparently defected and became “the first Chinese operative to ever blow his cover.”

But not everyone believes his story: According to Australian scholars Adam Ni and Yun Jiang, “Wang Liqiang’s story is unconvincing so far,” although they have approached their analysis “with great care given the possibility that Mr Wang and his family may be in danger.”

Meanwhile, in Taiwan, China Innovation Investment, a little-known Hong Kong firm dragged into spying allegations it denies, says Taipei has waded into the matter by initiating an investigation into two of its senior staff, reports the South China Morning Post.

The Taiwanese authorities have asked Xiàng Xīn 向心, China Innovations’ chairman and chief executive, and his wife Kung Ching [龚青 Gōng Qīng], an alternate director, to cooperate with an investigation it is carrying out into “the matter of the news reports,” the company said.

It was referring to recent media reports that a man claiming to be a Chinese spy seeking asylum in Australia alleged he undertook undercover espionage work in Hong Kong, Taiwan and Australia.

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