China’s edgiest photography festival - SupChina
Free

We're a new type of news publication

China news you won't read elsewhere.

Weekly Newsletter

Get a roundup of the most important and interesting stories coming out of China.

Podcasts

Sinica, TechBuzz China, and our 6 other shows are the undisputed champs of China podcasts. Listen now.

Feature Articles

Interactive, web-based deep dives into the real China.

Premium

Join the thousands of executives, diplomats, and journalists that rely on SupChina for daily analysis of the full China story.

Daily Newsletter

All the news, every day. Premium analysis directly from our Editor-in-Chief Jeremy Goldkorn.

24/7 Slack Community

Have China-related questions and want answers? Our Slack community is a place to learn, network, and opine.

Free Live Events & More

Monthly live conference calls with leading experts, free entry to SupChina live events in cities around the world, and more.

"A jewel in the crown of China reporting. I go to it, look for it daily. Why? It adds so much insight into the real China. Essential news, culture, color. I find SupChina superior."
— Max Baucus, former U.S. Ambassador to China

Free

We're a new type of news publication

China news you won't read elsewhere.

Weekly Newsletter

Get a roundup of the most important and interesting stories coming out of China.

Podcasts

Sinica, TechBuzz China, and our 6 other shows are the undisputed champs of China podcasts. Listen now.

Feature Articles

Interactive, web-based deep dives into the real China.

OR… for more in-depth analysis and an online community of China-focused professionals:

Learn About Premium Access Now!
Learn More
Minimize
Learn More
Minimize

China’s edgiest photography festival

Part of the SupChina Weekly Briefing newsletter. Subscribe for free

The Granary, one of the spaces hosting photography at the Lianzhou International Photo Festival. Photo by Thomas Bird.

The Rencontres d’Arles is an internationally renowned French photography festival that has taken place every year since 1970, and has remained “a surprisingly gritty affair,” as a writer for The Guardian observed this summer.

China has its own version of Rencontres d’Arles, at least in spirit if not quite in scale or prestige. The Lianzhou International Photo Festival, established in 2005, is currently celebrating its 15th anniversary from the small western Guangdong city of Lianzhou (pop. 400,000), featuring works from established and up-and-coming photographers alike. The exhibition spaces are converted factories, giving this festival a distinctly “gritty” feel.

Perhaps too gritty, in some cases. Authorities and censors have meddled before, and curators and organizers have expressed the need to be “careful” moving forward. How does a large artistic and cultural event maintain its authenticity in China’s current climate? “Lianzhou’s curators have been smart, but will need to be smarter moving forward,” says Shenzhen-based photographer Lǐ Zhèngdé 李政德.

Click through to read more, as SupChina contributor Thomas Bird sends this dispatch from Lianzhou.

Share

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.