Editor's note for Wednesday, January 8, 2020 - SupChina
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Editor’s note for Wednesday, January 8, 2020

Dear Access member,

Counterpoint: On Monday, I suggested that Beijing’s new chief representative in Hong Kong,  Luò Huìníng 骆惠宁, was sent to the city to crack skulls — metaphorically if not literally — rather than listen to Hongkongers. One reader who has excellent sources in China told me that Luo does, in fact, have a reputation for being a careful listener. The South China Morning Post suggests something similar in this article: Beijing’s new Hong Kong envoy Luo Huining was a surprise choice. Here’s why.

My mind remains open, my heart is inclined to expect the worst.

China’s Polar Frontiers is the name of a new show in two parts from the Sustainable Asia podcast, in which the hosts interview a mix of Chinese and foreign specialists on China and conservation issues in the Arctic and Antarctic.  

Never Defeated is the title of an event at the China Institute in New York on January 29 featuring Yán Lán 阎兰 and Méi Yàn 梅燕, “two of the most influential businesswomen in China.”

The former heads Lazard’s operations in Greater China, and the latter oversees Brunswick Group’s advisory work in China. Both hailing from prominent families, they have experienced firsthand the turmoil of Communist China’s history at the political center.

Our word of the day is Cecolin, or 馨可宁 xīn kě níng, the name of a new domestically produced HPV (human papillomavirus) vaccine in China (see story #3).

—Jeremy Goldkorn, Editor-in-Chief

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Jeremy Goldkorn

Jeremy Goldkorn worked in China for 20 years as an editor and entrepreneur. He is editor-in-chief of SupChina, and co-founder of the Sinica Podcast.

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