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Outrageous nepotism at prestigious finance journal

The Chinese Banker, a high-profile Chinese finance journal, has come under fire for a series of personal essays written by a young author over the course of the last 12 years. The contributor, whose first byline for the journal was published at the age of 10, is the son of the journal’s editor-in-chief, Wáng Sōngqí 王松奇. Wang is also the Party secretary of the Institute of Finance, a research facility associated with the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (CASS).

The controversial essays appeared under the column “A collection of a father and his son’s work.” Created by Wang the elder in 2006, it’s essentially a self-aggrandizing space for him to display his calligraphy, and the writings of his son Wáng Qīngshí 王青石.

The younger Wang’s genius is on display in essays such as “A tribute to four seasons,” written when Wang was a fifth grader. A quote: “Grass has turned green. Flowers are blossoming. Spring is here!”

After the essays were circulated, outraged social media users accused the elder Wang of blatant nepotism and academic misconduct. The backlash prompted the journal to announce that it was “handling the matter” and would release a statement at a later time.

Earlier this week, China’s Journal of Glaciology and Geocryology, a key journal in the field of geography, drew a great deal of criticism for an article in which the author unabashedly praised his adviser for his “noble qualities” in the name of science.

Click through to SupChina for the full story.

—Jiayun Feng

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Jiayun Feng

Jiayun was born in Shanghai, where she spent her first 20 years and earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism at Fudan University. Interested in writing for a global audience, she attended the NYU Graduate School of Journalism for its Global & Joint Program Studies, which allowed her to pursue a journalism career along with her interest in international relations. She has previously interned for Sixth Tone and Shanghai Daily.

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