Editor's note for Tuesday, January 21, 2020 - SupChina
Free

We're a new type of news publication

China news you won't read elsewhere.

Weekly Newsletter

Get a roundup of the most important and interesting stories coming out of China.

Podcasts

Sinica, TechBuzz China, and our 6 other shows are the undisputed champs of China podcasts. Listen now.

Feature Articles

Interactive, web-based deep dives into the real China.

Premium

Join the thousands of executives, diplomats, and journalists that rely on SupChina for daily analysis of the full China story.

Daily Newsletter

All the news, every day. Premium analysis directly from our Editor-in-Chief Jeremy Goldkorn.

24/7 Slack Community

Have China-related questions and want answers? Our Slack community is a place to learn, network, and opine.

Free Live Events & More

Monthly live conference calls with leading experts, free entry to SupChina live events in cities around the world, and more.

"A jewel in the crown of China reporting. I go to it, look for it daily. Why? It adds so much insight into the real China. Essential news, culture, color. I find SupChina superior."
— Max Baucus, former U.S. Ambassador to China

Free

We're a new type of news publication

China news you won't read elsewhere.

Weekly Newsletter

Get a roundup of the most important and interesting stories coming out of China.

Podcasts

Sinica, TechBuzz China, and our 6 other shows are the undisputed champs of China podcasts. Listen now.

Feature Articles

Interactive, web-based deep dives into the real China.

OR… for more in-depth analysis and an online community of China-focused professionals:

Learn About Premium Access Now!
Learn More
Minimize
Learn More
Minimize

Editor’s note for Tuesday, January 21, 2020

Dear Access member,

Last week, several days went by with suspiciously few updates on the emerging Wuhan coronavirus epidemic, but the information floodgates opened in China over the weekend. We’ve summarized the important news in today’s newsletter.

I was living in Beijing during the SARS lockdown of 2003, and was nearly imprisoned in a hotel room after an ill-advised business trip to Shanghai. Very strange times they were, brought back by an old film by artist Ài Wèiwèi 艾未未, which you can watch on YouTube: Living it up in a zone of infection: SARS in Beijing, 2003.

You might consider postponing nonessential travel to and around China. The system built to detect SARS — essentially body temperature scanners at airports, hotels, and train stations — is already in place. If you cough at a checkpoint, or the scanner shows you have even a mild fever, you might find yourself in a very inconvenient quarantine. In Shanghai in 2003, the hotel wanted to quarantine me just because I had traveled from Beijing, even though there was no such official order.

Our word of the day is 疫情 yìqíng, which literally means “epidemic situation” but can be translated as “epidemic,” and is often used in headlines related to developing epidemics.

—Jeremy Goldkorn, Editor-in-Chief

Share
Jeremy Goldkorn

Jeremy Goldkorn worked in China for 20 years as an editor and entrepreneur. He is editor-in-chief of SupChina, and co-founder of the Sinica Podcast.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.