Links for Tuesday, January 28, 2020 - SupChina
Free

We're a new type of news publication

China news you won't read elsewhere.

Weekly Newsletter

Get a roundup of the most important and interesting stories coming out of China.

Podcasts

Sinica, TechBuzz China, and our 6 other shows are the undisputed champs of China podcasts. Listen now.

Feature Articles

Interactive, web-based deep dives into the real China.

Premium

Join the thousands of executives, diplomats, and journalists that rely on SupChina for daily analysis of the full China story.

Daily Newsletter

All the news, every day. Premium analysis directly from our Editor-in-Chief Jeremy Goldkorn.

24/7 Slack Community

Have China-related questions and want answers? Our Slack community is a place to learn, network, and opine.

Free Live Events & More

Monthly live conference calls with leading experts, free entry to SupChina live events in cities around the world, and more.

"A jewel in the crown of China reporting. I go to it, look for it daily. Why? It adds so much insight into the real China. Essential news, culture, color. I find SupChina superior."
— Max Baucus, former U.S. Ambassador to China

Free

We're a new type of news publication

China news you won't read elsewhere.

Weekly Newsletter

Get a roundup of the most important and interesting stories coming out of China.

Podcasts

Sinica, TechBuzz China, and our 6 other shows are the undisputed champs of China podcasts. Listen now.

Feature Articles

Interactive, web-based deep dives into the real China.

OR… for more in-depth analysis and an online community of China-focused professionals:

Learn About Premium Access Now!
Learn More
Minimize
Learn More
Minimize

Links for Tuesday, January 28, 2020

BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY:

The colorful dances of Bali’s annual Kintamani Festival have fallen victim to coronavirus — and travel restrictions to halt its spread could prove costly for other places that rely on Chinese tourists.

Promoted by the Indonesian island as a draw for Chinese holidaymakers, the February 8 festival to celebrate the marriage of an ancient king of Bali to a Chinese princess has been called off in anticipation of a collapse in visitor numbers.

In other Asian destinations, too, fear of the virus is accompanied by worries that business is about to disappear…
Thailand, the top destination for China’s holidaymakers, forecast that Chinese tourist numbers would fall by as much as 2 million this year from 11 million in 2019.

Tourism has become a much more important prop to Japan’s growth over the last decade, and Chinese tourists are the biggest-spenders. That’s why China’s decision Saturday to start blocking outbound tour groups to try to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus has some Japan economists concerned.

If the much higher visitor numbers now tumble at the same pace as they did during the SARS outbreak of around three months, Japanese growth could be cut by 0.2 percentage point, according to economist Shuji Tonouchi at Mitsubishi UFJ Morgan Stanley. Should the crisis drag on for a full year, it could shave 0.45 percentage point from Japan’s expansion, estimates Nomura Research Institute economist Takahide Kiuchi.

The Wall Street Journal appears to be first out of the block to look at the economic impact with this interesting article from January 26. Key point: back during the SARS virus of 2003, China’s economy was hit hard, even though then the economy was even more investment-driven, and most consumption came via purchases by the state and its companies. This time the impact will be worse, with an economy much more dependent on individual’s consumption, where the virus’ spread will surely inhibit buying, even if some purchasing can still happen online.

  • Transparency must be improved and deep concerns addressed, says former presidential adviser Aung Tun Thet.
  • A raft of infrastructure deals have just been signed, including for a strategically important deep-sea port project.

SCIENCE, HEALTH, AND THE ENVIRONMENT:

POLITICS AND CURRENT AFFAIRS:

John R. Bolton, the former national security adviser, privately told Attorney General William P. Barr last year that he had concerns that President Trump was effectively granting personal favors to the autocratic leaders of Turkey and China, according to an unpublished manuscript by Mr. Bolton…
Mr. Bolton wrote in the manuscript that Mr. Barr singled out Mr. Trump’s conversations with Mr. Xi about the Chinese telecommunications firm ZTE, which agreed in 2017 to plead guilty and pay heavy fines for violating American sanctions on doing business with North Korea, Iran and other countries. A year later, Mr. Trump lifted the sanctions over objections from his own advisers and Republican lawmakers.

The Chinese Embassy in Copenhagen has demanded an apology from Danish newspaper Jyllands-posten for publishing a Chinese flag with the coronavirus on it.

The image by Niels Bo Bojesen featured the Chinese flag with the yellow stars replaced with pictures of the novel coronavirus. The newspaper published the cartoon in their ‘Today’s Cartoon’ section with a disclaimer saying that the cartoon represented the artist’s personal interpretation, which may differ from the position of the paper.

Despite this, the Chinese Embassy in Denmark called on Jyllands-posten and Bojesen to immediately apologize to the Chinese people.

  • Country has also reduced reliance on foreign weapons and military technology as its own industry expands, according to new research.
  • Stockholm International Peace Research Institute puts total sales by Chinese arms firms at $70 billion to $80 billion in 2017.

Ahead of its much-anticipated chairmanship of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) next year, and amid a months-long naval showdown in the South China Sea, Vietnam has hinted at the possibility of legal warfare against China. Vietnamese deputy foreign minister Le Hoai Trung openly warned in early November that diplomacy isn’t the only tool at Hanoi’s disposal…

Based on the Philippines’ experience in its arbitration case against China, lawfare seems a risky yet potentially viable option for Vietnam. Beijing proved willing to employ numerous economic levers to punish Manila for filing that case in 2013; Vietnam, which is much more dependent on trade with China, could face significantly greater economic damage if it filed a case. But the payoff could be worth the risk.

  • Video: Troubles on the Belt and Road in Pakistan
    From 101 East Al Jazeera on Twitter: “China, you came here without our consent, supported our enemies… Balochistan will be a graveyard for your expansionist motives.”

SOCIETY AND CULTURE:

There are only 13 scenes in “Another Year,” a three-hour long documentary, and all of them feature the same long, static shots of the same family doing the same, everyday activity: eating a meal.

It’s a bold visual experiment by director Zhū Shēngzè 朱聲仄, a 32-year-old Chicago-based documentary filmmaker. Given no context, the audience is plunged into the life of one Chinese family through their dinnertime discussions that range from whether to buy new chopsticks to how to deal with Grandma’s stroke.

The effect is that of feeling part of the family’s joys and frustrations about the mundane, and seeing how, over the film’s 14-month timespan, small changes can have big repercussions.

Since she began posting rustic-chic videos of her life in rural Sichuan province in 2016, Lǐ Zǐqī 李子柒, 29, has become one of China’s biggest social media stars. She has 22 million followers on the microblogging site Weibo, 34 million on Douyin (China’s version of TikTok) and another 8.3 million on YouTube…

Share

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.