Why you should visit Wuhan when the epidemic subsides - SupChina
Free

We're a new type of news publication

China news you won't read elsewhere.

Weekly Newsletter

Get a roundup of the most important and interesting stories coming out of China.

Podcasts

Sinica, TechBuzz China, and our 6 other shows are the undisputed champs of China podcasts. Listen now.

Feature Articles

Interactive, web-based deep dives into the real China.

Premium

Join the thousands of executives, diplomats, and journalists that rely on SupChina for daily analysis of the full China story.

Daily Newsletter

All the news, every day. Premium analysis directly from our Editor-in-Chief Jeremy Goldkorn.

24/7 Slack Community

Have China-related questions and want answers? Our Slack community is a place to learn, network, and opine.

Free Live Events & More

Monthly live conference calls with leading experts, free entry to SupChina live events in cities around the world, and more.

"A jewel in the crown of China reporting. I go to it, look for it daily. Why? It adds so much insight into the real China. Essential news, culture, color. I find SupChina superior."
— Max Baucus, former U.S. Ambassador to China

Free

We're a new type of news publication

China news you won't read elsewhere.

Weekly Newsletter

Get a roundup of the most important and interesting stories coming out of China.

Podcasts

Sinica, TechBuzz China, and our 6 other shows are the undisputed champs of China podcasts. Listen now.

Feature Articles

Interactive, web-based deep dives into the real China.

OR… for more in-depth analysis and an online community of China-focused professionals:

Learn About Premium Access Now!
Learn More
Minimize
Learn More
Minimize

Why you should visit Wuhan when the epidemic subsides

SupChina illustration by Derek Zheng

Several internet users issued reminders that the city of Wuhan is more than the coronavirus — it’s a historical center of politics, culture, and commerce that is well worth a visit:

Wuhan native Yuli Yang of CNN tweeted this thread celebrating some of the city’s accomplishments and sources of pride, including its hot dry noodles (热干面 règānmiàn), tennis Hall of Famer Lǐ Nà 李娜, and the origin of the word zhiyin (知音 zhīyīn), which means “best friend” or “confidant.”

British historian Robert Bickers tells the story of Wuhan as a centuries-old hub of global commerce and Chinese interaction with the outside world.

A student in Wuhan named Xiaoyu Lu has this dispatch from the quarantined city (the story begins: “The only thing that hasn’t changed since they shut down the city is my grandmother’s insistence on walking the dog”).

Australian-Chinese political cartoonist Badiucao has been translating a Wuhan resident’s diary, helpfully posted on translator David Cowhig’s website (first entry here).

For a different perspective, here’s a Facebook group of Wuhan expatriates.

Share

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.