Will there be a flood of Chinese students returning from abroad? - SupChina
Free

We're a new type of news publication

China news you won't read elsewhere.

Weekly Newsletter

Get a roundup of the most important and interesting stories coming out of China.

Podcasts

Sinica, TechBuzz China, and our 6 other shows are the undisputed champs of China podcasts. Listen now.

Feature Articles

Interactive, web-based deep dives into the real China.

Premium

Join the thousands of executives, diplomats, and journalists that rely on SupChina for daily analysis of the full China story.

Daily Newsletter

All the news, every day. Premium analysis directly from our Editor-in-Chief Jeremy Goldkorn.

24/7 Slack Community

Have China-related questions and want answers? Our Slack community is a place to learn, network, and opine.

Free Live Events & More

Monthly live conference calls with leading experts, free entry to SupChina live events in cities around the world, and more.

"A jewel in the crown of China reporting. I go to it, look for it daily. Why? It adds so much insight into the real China. Essential news, culture, color. I find SupChina superior."
— Max Baucus, former U.S. Ambassador to China

Free

We're a new type of news publication

China news you won't read elsewhere.

Weekly Newsletter

Get a roundup of the most important and interesting stories coming out of China.

Podcasts

Sinica, TechBuzz China, and our 6 other shows are the undisputed champs of China podcasts. Listen now.

Feature Articles

Interactive, web-based deep dives into the real China.

OR… for more in-depth analysis and an online community of China-focused professionals:

Learn About Premium Access Now!
Learn More
Minimize
Learn More
Minimize

Will there be a flood of Chinese students returning from abroad?

In an announcement dated April 5 (in Chinese), the Chinese embassy in the U.S. says that it plans to charter flights for students to return to China. Caixin has more details:

The first batch of applications will be open to minors who aren’t accompanied by their parents.

The embassy said that most Chinese students studying in the U.S. are still in the country, but it will arrange flights “considering the needs of underage students who might face difficulties and need to return to China.”

The students will have to pay their own air fare and cover the cost of their mandatory quarantine when they arrive in China, the embassy said, adding that the Chinese government will not accept responsibility for any risks encountered on the journey…

Of the more than 400,000 overseas Chinese students in the U.S., about 90% of them remain in the country, according to a Friday statement (link in Chinese) from the embassy. “Don’t be too anxious if staying in the U.S. The chance of contracting the disease is very low,” the embassy wrote, adding that three Chinese students in the U.S. have been infected, with two now receiving treatment and one already recovered.

The announcement comes after a similar chartered flight took nearly 200 young students from London back to Jinan, Shandong Province on April 2. Earlier returning students from coronavirus hotspots such as Italy have been dragged online for risking China’s success at containing COVID-19, as SupChina has reported. For more on Chinese students stuck abroad, see:

Meanwhile, China reported dozens more COVID-19 cases over the weekend, most of them asymptomatic or imported. Land borders, including with Russia, are now the target of tightening controls, reports Reuters — despite the fact that returning Chinese nationals account for most imported cases.

Fines of up to 30,000 yuan ($4,230) will be levied on any inbound passenger who is found to “conceal or falsify their health conditions and travel histories,” according to China Daily.

—Lucas Niewenhuis

Share
Lucas Niewenhuis

Lucas Niewenhuis is an associate editor at SupChina who helps curate daily news and produce the company's newsletter, app, and website content. Previously, Lucas researched China-Africa relations at the Social Science Research Council and interned at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York. He has studied Chinese language and culture in Shanghai and Beijing, and is a graduate of the University of Michigan.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.