Qingdao zoo cancels animal shows for good, replacing them with educational programs - SupChina
Free

We're a new type of news publication

China news you won't read elsewhere.

Weekly Newsletter

Get a roundup of the most important and interesting stories coming out of China.

Podcasts

Sinica, TechBuzz China, and our 6 other shows are the undisputed champs of China podcasts. Listen now.

Feature Articles

Interactive, web-based deep dives into the real China.

Premium

Join the thousands of executives, diplomats, and journalists that rely on SupChina for daily analysis of the full China story.

Daily Newsletter

All the news, every day. Premium analysis directly from our Editor-in-Chief Jeremy Goldkorn.

24/7 Slack Community

Have China-related questions and want answers? Our Slack community is a place to learn, network, and opine.

Free Live Events & More

Monthly live conference calls with leading experts, free entry to SupChina live events in cities around the world, and more.

"A jewel in the crown of China reporting. I go to it, look for it daily. Why? It adds so much insight into the real China. Essential news, culture, color. I find SupChina superior."
— Max Baucus, former U.S. Ambassador to China

Free

We're a new type of news publication

China news you won't read elsewhere.

Weekly Newsletter

Get a roundup of the most important and interesting stories coming out of China.

Podcasts

Sinica, TechBuzz China, and our 6 other shows are the undisputed champs of China podcasts. Listen now.

Feature Articles

Interactive, web-based deep dives into the real China.

OR… for more in-depth analysis and an online community of China-focused professionals:

Learn About Premium Access Now!
Learn More
Minimize
Learn More
Minimize

Qingdao zoo cancels animal shows for good, replacing them with educational programs

Over the years, Chinese zoos have earned themselves a poor reputation when it comes to the treatment of animals. There have been a considerable number of reports revealing practices such as underfeeding, keeping animals in poor living conditions, and forcing them to perform demeaning tricks for entertainment purposes.

However, as awareness of wildlife welfare and conservation grows, some Chinese zoos are transforming themselves from profit-oriented businesses into educational institutions whose main functions are to save endangered species and teach the public about animals and conservation.

The latest facility to join this admirable initiative is Qingdao Forest Wildlife World. Home to over 5,000 wild animals and 263 species, the zoo announced today that it had halted animal performances permanently and replaced them with educational programs.

“Canceling the shows was not only our way to show respect for animals, but a necessary decision for us given that we want to restore the public welfare side of our zoo in the long run,” the zoo announced. “During the transformation, we hope that more people will take part in conservation efforts, turning the Qingdao Forest Wildlife World into an educational place where animals and humans coexist in harmony.”

The zoo also noted that it came to the decision after years of attempts to make animal shows less exploitative and more educational: Although performances like tightrope-walking bears and bike-riding monkeys have delighted visitors greatly over the years, they failed to convey meaningful messages that resonated with the audiences.

63207a53ly1ge2pkomtcbj20vy0u0n4w

When speaking to The Paper (in Chinese), the zoo’s director, Lǐ Huànbīn 李焕斌, explained that the ban had been in effect since April 1, but it was decided to make the announcement public on April 22 — this year’s Earth Day — in order to draw attention to broader issues like animal welfare and protection. Celebrated annually on April 22, the holiday was created by UNESCO to promote awareness and appreciation for Earth’s environment. Li also said that the zoo would send animal care employees to schools and communities on a nearly weekly basis to perform educational work about species and their protection.

On Chinese social media, comments about the decision have been overwhelmingly positive. “I hope there won’t be any animal shows across on this planet, but I know we need to take it step by step. This is an applaudable move on the zoo’s part,” one Weibo user commented.

Share
Jiayun Feng

Jiayun was born in Shanghai, where she spent her first 20 years and earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism at Fudan University. Interested in writing for a global audience, she attended the NYU Graduate School of Journalism for its Global & Joint Program Studies, which allowed her to pursue a journalism career along with her interest in international relations. She has previously interned for Sixth Tone and Shanghai Daily.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.