Links for Wednesday, July 8, 2020

Notable China news from around the web.

BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY:

SCIENCE, HEALTH, AND THE ENVIRONMENT:

POLITICS AND CURRENT AFFAIRS:

Li Fan, the Founder and Director of the World and China Institute and the Editor in Chief of the journal World and China Affairs, writes, “Even now, civil society is quietly growing. I continue to see people criticizing the government and promoting ideas of democracy, rule of law, and freedom on websites and social media.”

In tweaking New Zealand’s position, however, Ardern is seeking to be less confrontational than the Trump administration and Australia’s government — which is viewed here as “deputy sheriff” to the United States — even while often making the same points.

SOCIETY AND CULTURE:

  • China’s first sexual harassment lawsuit
    Plaintiff wins China’s first sexual harassment lawsuit / Sixth Tone
    “At the time, ‘sexual harassment’ had not been defined or protected by law, so Xiang and her lawyer could only sue Liu for infringing her personality rights. After the Supreme Court’s 2018 decision, however, she and her lawyer were able to change their case’s cause of action to sexual harassment.”
  • Despite flooding, the gaokao must go on
    China floods: Students cling to tractors to get to gaokao college entrance exam / Washington Post (paywall)
  • Busted cheating ring in Shanghai
    English exam cheating ring busted in Shanghai / Sixth Tone
  • Nude painting in the early 20th century
    Whores of Yore on Twitter: “This is the work of Chinese artist, Pan Yuliang (潘玉良, 1895 – 1977). Pan became famous for being the first woman to paint in xiyanghua, (Western style), but her work on nudes was also highly controversial & drew considerable criticism. Thread”
  • Should primary school students study internet celebrities?
    Should internet celebrities be part of the school curriculum? / Caixin (paywall)
    “Chinese vlogger Lǐ Zǐqī 李子柒 became an internet sensation thanks to her videos of idyllic rural life. Recently, a story about her appeared in a reading comprehension exam at a primary school in Zhejiang, triggering concerned parents to question her suitability in a school curriculum.”