Jude Blanchette on the Hong Kong protests | Sinica Podcast | SupChina
Free

We're a new type of news publication

China news you won't read elsewhere.

Weekly Newsletter

Get a roundup of the most important and interesting stories coming out of China.

Podcasts

Sinica, TechBuzz China, and our 6 other shows are the undisputed champs of China podcasts. Listen now.

Feature Articles

Interactive, web-based deep dives into the real China.

Premium

Join the thousands of executives, diplomats, and journalists that rely on SupChina for daily analysis of the full China story.

Daily Newsletter

All the news, every day. Premium analysis directly from our Editor-in-Chief Jeremy Goldkorn.

24/7 Slack Community

Have China-related questions and want answers? Our Slack community is a place to learn, network, and opine.

Free Live Events & More

Monthly live conference calls with leading experts, free entry to SupChina live events in cities around the world, and more.

"A jewel in the crown of China reporting. I go to it, look for it daily. Why? It adds so much insight into the real China. Essential news, culture, color. I find SupChina superior."
— Max Baucus, former U.S. Ambassador to China

Free

We're a new type of news publication

China news you won't read elsewhere.

Weekly Newsletter

Get a roundup of the most important and interesting stories coming out of China.

Podcasts

Sinica, TechBuzz China, and our 6 other shows are the undisputed champs of China podcasts. Listen now.

Feature Articles

Interactive, web-based deep dives into the real China.

OR… for more in-depth analysis and an online community of China-focused professionals:

Learn About Premium Access Now!
Learn More
Minimize
Learn More
Minimize

Jude Blanchette on the Hong Kong protests

Jude Blanchette, the Freeman Chair in China Studies at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), joins Kaiser for a discussion of the ongoing Hong Kong protests, possible U.S. responses, Beijing’s puzzling inaction, the perspectives of mainland Chinese, and media coverage of ongoing events in Hong Kong.

4:52: Hong Kong’s young democratic leaders

15:39: The volatility of the Hong Kong protests

27:10: Mainland sentiments on Hong Kong

38:21: Media coverage of the protests

46:04: Speaking Mandarin, a new liability in Hong Kong?

Recommendations:

Jude: How Hong Kong got to this point, an essay by Richard Bush.

Kaiser: Our Man: Richard Holbrooke and the End of the American Century, by George Packer.

Share
Kaiser Kuo

Kaiser Kuo is co-founder of the Sinica Podcast and editor-at-large of SupChina.

2 Comments

  1. Echo Reply

    The truth of Hong Konger or Western’s demecracy is:
    if you agree with their ideaoligy, you are on the same board.
    If not, either you are either a bootlicker , or you are influenced by the cencorship and are afraid of speaking our your freewill.

    This is something I find funny. Being a Chinese and living overseas over a decade, I read western ‘factual and no-biased'(at least this is what they considered) news . I also read news from China. Personally I will not say they(western media) are better than us. Check the news covering Hong Kong… Most journalists or reporters put too much personal opinions in when the write the story.

    I admit that there is a huge value gap. But the way both sides treat it, it is really a shame.

    I listened to your latest podcast from Jude Blanchette. I highly recommend, when you speak about mainland chinese people, please try to also speak with university students or normal people on the street. Because when I heard you say: the idea to support Hong Kong is widespead in Mainland China. I just want to laugh.

  2. reply Reply

    The Chinese version of the truth of any Hong Kong massive protests is:
    if you support the police beating students then you are a good patriotic Chinese and a qualified HKer. if not, you are either hired by CIA, a pawn of the “western anti-Chinese forces”, or you are simply a ignorant rioter, a trash subhuman deserving no mercy.

    This is what i find funny: While the Party absolutely controls all media’s political stance in China and there is only one voice towards HK, while it’s still hard to count how many mainland residents have been arrested by the Gong’an just because they leaved some positive comments on the protest,
    someone still claim that virtually China’s political news toward HK ONLY have same amount of personal (actually it’s the party’s) biases as that of free-world media, judging whether a story is objective enough based on their own personal belief, which might even been nurtured from the highly censored stories on the Chinese domestic SNS like wechat.
    So this is their discrediting strategy: if you can’t convince people to believe that media in China are better, just pull that in the free-world down to the same level.

    Tbh I would not say a random journalist in the free-world individually will be more objective than their Chinese counterpart, but systematically they will be more fair as a whole, because the American government can’t forbid anyone post their diverse political opinions, even the notorious state mouthpiece of China.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.