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Online discourse and censorship in China

Jane Li, a Chongqing native and a technology reporter for Quartz, talks through some of the differences between Twitter and its Chinese equivalent, Weibo. She also discusses the website Douban, the lively and open discussion among its young users, and the threat that looming censorship poses to it. In addition, she provides details on why some Chinese internet users have turned their backs on Huawei in the wake of an extended jail term served by one of its employees.

4:10: Twitter vs. Weibo — what’s the difference?

6:52: The “China Twitter” maelstrom

11:06: Online discourse regarding the Hong Kong protests

14:23: What is “251” and how does it relate to Huawei?

20:04: The Douban online ecosystem

Jordan Schneider

Jordan Schneider is a Beijing-based professional who works with Chinese internet companies on internationalization strategies. Back in the U.S., he spent time at the Eurasia Group and Bridgewater Associates. His Chinese landscape paintings "show promise."

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